Science

"LG showcases new rollable 65" OLED display

Now for 2018, even the insane build of the W7 OLED has been completely outdone by an all-new OLED 65 inch 4K HDR TV prototype that can be essentially rolled right up like a sheet due to its ultra-thin and extremely flexible build. Once rolled in, the display looks like a sound bar.

LG Display will be showing off the world's first 65-inch UHD rollable OLED TV at the annual Consumer Electronics Show (CES) this week. LG will in any case reveal more details when they open their booth at CES 2018 later in the week.

Last year, the firm successfully developed a 77-inch transparent OLED display.

LG's Roll Up TV is a big-screen variant of the 18-inch screen concept, showed at CES 2016, and can be actually rolled up by like a poster. For those who don't want their TVs dominating the living room, LG touted this set as one you can roll up and hide when you want it out of sight, "allowing for better space utilization, something existing displays can't deliver". Smaller-scale versions of flexible displays have been used by LG before - like in the LG G Flex 2, for example - but seeing it used in a proper TV-like package is new territory.

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"With this unparalleled portability, the 65-inch rollable display ensures that users can enjoy bright, high-resolution content anytime, anywhere". LG first showed off the wallpaper model previous year.

Looking at the overall flat panel market, IHS Markit found that global liquid crystal display (LCD) TV shipments in November declined month over month by 1.6%, falling to 24.4 million units, as Black Friday demand in the United States declined in 2017 compared with the prior year.

Meanwhile, LG Display is entering the global lighting market with its OLED panels. LG has also upgraded in the audio category from the current standard 2.1 channel sound to 3.1 channel sound.