Science

'Mummy, what's felching?' Tot gets smut served by Android app

'Mummy, what's felching?' Tot gets smut served by Android app

The researchers said the code could "wreak havoc" in three possible ways: display web ads that were often inappropriate and pornographic, attempt to trick users into installing fake "security apps", and try to make users register for some sort of premium services at a cost.

Researchers have found a batch of over 60 malware-carrying apps in Google's Play Store created to rob mobile users or show them pornography, all with a kid-friendly theme.

Check Point has a full list of the affected apps in its post on the issue.

More news: China's trade surplus with USA widens in 2017
More news: LG's new 65in 4K TV can be rolled up like a poster
More news: Could Germany have a deal?

Google has removed the offending apps from the Google Play Store, but the games have already been downloaded more than 3 million times.

The games included "Paw Puppy Run Subway Surf", "Shin Hero Boy Adventure Game, ' 'Drawing Lessons Lego Ninjago, ' and 'Addon Sponge Bob for MCPE". Security firm Check Point uncovered the malicious bug that showed porn in game apps. All of these are displayed to children on a rotating basis while they play the infected games. The apps could be found in the Google Play store, and some of them were games geared toward children. "I did and my son opened it and a bunch off thilthy [sic] hardcore porn pictures popped up". This only works on Android phones as it uses Google's App Preview Messaging service that was first used with Allo in 2016, so trying to call iPhone users that don't have the app still won't work. "We appreciate Check Point's work to help keep users safe".

While some ads showed pornographic images, there were other apps that displayed fake notices which that the phone had been infected by a virus and provided a malicious link to a fake virus cleaner. "Should the user answer them, the malicious code informs the user that he has been successful, and asks him to enter his phone number to receive the prize". "Indeed, these plots continue to be effective even today, especially when they originate in apps downloaded from trusted sources such as Google Play". In December, YouTube said that Google was planning to increase the number of staff reviewing videos to more than 10,000. It also meant to get users to buy worthless premium services, the researchers found.